Monthly Archives: April 2009

must be lunch time…

Zevro® | perfetto pasta cooker

Seems like my stomach is trying to tell me something. I found this pasta cooker from Zervo and thought it was worthy of a mention. The ‘perfetto’ cooks spaghetti and other pastas using approx 1 litre of water- thats up to 50% less of the water used in traditional stove top cooking. There is no need for stirring or monitoring either. So how does it save so much water? I think it is due to the hands free style of cooking. When I cook spaghetti, I fill the saucepan right up to avoid the pot boiling dry- in this case there is no risk of that occuring. The lid of the perfetto is also a colander and dry pasta can be stored in it. nice

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Ecokettle

Google Image Result for http://webecoist.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/green-gadgets1.jpg

The Ecokettle allows its user to select exactly how much water they need to boil. The water is measured in cups 1-8 and is released into a specific heating chamber. This saves time, electricity and (they boast) water. The water saving is not as significant as the energy saving however I guess a fair amount of water is lost due to steam in a kettle. Do people discard unwanted boiled water from a kettle? We don’t. It just gets boiled again when we next need hot water.

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rain power

Lightdrops Umbrella is Powered by Rain

I found this new umbrella design (by Sang-Kyun Park) through searching in Iconocast.com
This umbrella uses the energy from rain drops falling on its surface to turn on LED lights. The rain drops energy is harvested as kinetic energy- the heavier the rain the brighter the light. The umbrella surface is made from
polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF).

Not only do we waste water on a regular basis, it seems we also waste its potential to create energy.

What if an entire roof top was created in a similar way? We could be lighting our lives with PVDF roof tops.
rainlightdrops

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‘M.E’ Filming Methodology

This is a first draft of the M.E filming methodology. For my research of Micro Events (M.E) i decided to take videos. Here I have begun to establish a method for the videoing. The method will ensure that all of the filming sits on even ground and can be viewed and analysed in a similar fashion.

Background

Capturing micro events will form a large proportion of my research for semester one. I began with trying Visual Sociology in the form of photography and participant observer studies. Quickly I discovered that this method, whilst useful for capturing still shots, could not capture a whole event. Micro events can occur in any amount of time, from 10 seconds to 10 minutes, and I needed to find and establish a method for capturing their randomness. Through videoing I found that I had a more successful medium for capturing the micro events of interest. I think it will also be useful to establish a M.E (micro event) videoing methodology- ‘M.E methodology’ to be followed through all videoing completed. This way, I can analyse the information I gather in context of each other, and establish some formality within my research.

  1. Video

The video should act as an eye to a situation that can be returned to and used for continuous research and inspiration.

Method:

  1. Analyse the location of filming. Ensure that there is clear access for videoing and that any objects vital to the film are present
  2. Brief the participant. Explain the action that you are wanting to film and what you will be doing whilst the task is being completed. The participant should have no prior knowledge of other participants results and should be encouraged to play out a normal course of events
  3. Turn camera on and motion for the participant to begin.
  4. Follow participant throughout entire event. Event can be shot over 2 shots if required.
  5. Motion for the end of filming and turn of camera.

Notes:

  • The researcher should play no role in the film, and be careful to avoid prompting any action or result.
  • The filming itself should be of 1 or 2 shots, clearly showing the event of interest.
  • The film should capture the event, as well as general surrounds and a person’s body.
  • The film should also clearly capture the lead up to the event and the finish, not just the actions of interest. Be sure to capture an entire event, not just snippets.

The film should capture any noise relevant to the situation, including talking from the participant

2. Editing

    Once all footage has been shot, its needs to be viewed and edited for optimal use.

    Method:

    1. Download all footage to a suitable viewing and editing platform
    2. View all footage
    3. Group footage into tasks
    4. View footage in task groups
    5. Remove footage that is unnecessary and will not be useful to the enquiry
    6. Place selected footage into a video/movie making package (windows movie maker or similar)
    7. Save as movie file

    Notes:

    • Unnecessary footage could include instances of no action- finding a shot, motioning to the participant that filming has begun etc.
    • Footage can be sped up. When the video sequence has been established certain clips can be sped up to make viewing easier. Examples could include walking from one location to another, or running a tap. To be decided at researchers discretion.
    • The film should be a simple research tool. The use of special effects/creative editing is not required.

    • 3. Analysis

    The analysis stage lets the researcher decide upon what he/she will take from the task. This stage transforms the films into the research tools that they are.

    Method:

    1. View each movie as a separate piece
    2. When viewing take rough notes on key events
    3. Record the events in detail. In writing, discuss their importance and why they are being highlighted.
    4. Watch the video in reference to the idea of time and motion studies (Frank and Lillian Gilbreth). Highlight Therbligs and discuss (specific motions involved in the task) how they could be altered to improve efficiency.
    5. Record ideas or innovations that result from viewing the film. These can be done first in writing and then explored with simple and quick sketching.

    Notes:

    • The notes/discussions/ideas/sketches should be contained within one document that sits beside the film for viewing

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    We are poets that make our poetry in 3D form.”

    SV. 23/4/09

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    My shower curtain is a green warrior

    MoCo Loco: My Shower Curtain is a Green Warrior by Elisabeth Buecher

    elisabeth_buecher_my_shower_curtain_is_a_green_warrior_2.jpg

    The shower curtain that cuts down your water use. This shower curtain slowly infates whilst you shower. After a few minutes the curtain begins to invade your space and forces you to finish up. I really enjoy the humor in this piece. So many water saving ideas are strict and serious. Why not add a little humour- having fun with water saving has got to be a winner.

    elisabeth_buecher_my_shower_curtain_is_a_green_warrior_3.jpg

    These spikes act the same way- inflating whilst you shower and eventually pushing you out. The late designer Elisabeth Buecher comments on design for pain and design for you own good:

    ‘My approach to design can sometimes appear shockingly radical but I have got different reasons to legitimise that. An alarm clock is not what we can call a pleasurable object. It is often even painful to be awoken by it. However it is a necessary object, which regulates our lives and the society. That’s what I call the “design for pain and for our own good”. Some of my designs seem to constrain people, acting like an alarm clock, awaking people to the consciousness of their behaviour and giving them limits. People often need an external signal to behave more. In France the government added thousands of new radars on the roads to fight excessive speed. And it worked: there are far less people killed on the roads of France today. I call it “design of threat and punishment” and I use it as an educational tool.’

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    kind-of-a-colendar

    Google Image Result for http://www.craphound.com/images/ecocook1.jpg

    name of design : eco-cook
    design by : kechenyi camille from france

    nnnn.jpgcopy_1151_icon2.jpgcopy_922_icon3.jpg

    This design limits the number of pots you use when cooking and therefore the amount of water. Eco-cook forms barriers within the one pot so that a number of different items can be cooked at once. When each section is done they are lifted from the pot and strained at the same time. The water remaining can then be used for another process (watering a plant).
    Good. But I don’t know about veggies that taste like pasta or vise versa…

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